Short Film Saturday: Dym (Smoke)

Short films are an artform in and of themselves. Sadly, there are rarely avenues for these films to be displayed. While the platform I can offer is not a large one I do hope that by featuring short films on the weekend you’ll be encouraged to look for more that you do like or perhaps even work on your own. I will try to get these up on Saturday morning, which may be the ideal time to catch a short film: It’s a relaxed time and you’re in search of some entertainment but your attention span may not be as long as it will be later in the day.

The first film I am deciding to highlight is one called Smoke. It’s a film that was actually brought to my attention via an email from the film’s director. I’m sorry it took me so long to profile it here, however, I am glad he brought it to my attention as it truly is quite special.

The film is constructed in a stream-of-consciousness montage that is incited by the turning on of a tape recorder. What words are being spoken on the tape, or to it for that matter (if any), are left for the audience to divine as we don’t hear them. The images are rather surreal and at times completely disconnected and at others only connected by the common motif: smoke, be it in one form or another. While some images are Kubrickesque the film possesses a voice of it’s own that speaks to you in visual fragments seeking your input and associations to determine meaning. I’ve seen the film twice now and had two distinct, but both positive reactions to it.

Before I belabor it too long watch it for yourself:

2 comments

  1. Edmund Charles Davis-Quinn · January 21, 2012

    Very fascinating, almost a silent picture in a way. Not exactly sure what’s happening, almost seems like a dreamworld.

    • bernardovillela · January 21, 2012

      Yeah, one of the interesting things is that it raises more questions than it answers. One could interpret that these are images in the mind of the man as he either speaks to the recorder or listens to it. Those images can be as literal or as suggested as one can wish. I had a much firmer though still tenuous read on it the first time but I didn’t want to over explain my interpretation regardless. I think the visual riddles it poses are most of the enjoyment of it anyway.

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