Free Movie Friday: Little Men (1934)

Introduction

I wanted to start this series back in January. Basically, there are a lot of good movies out there that you can watch free and clear. Meaning you don’t have to pay for them <em>and </em>by streaming it free you’re not stealing it because they are in the public domain. Also, in some cases, these films are not all as ancient as copyright laws usually call for.

Little Men (1934)

Last week I discussed my history with filmic adaptations of this sequel to Louisa May Alcott’s classic. Another thing to note is that I slid into these adaptations sideways having known how tenuous the connection was and liking this story I’ve not looked into the original. The connection is such that if you’re a fan of semantics, like I am, it’s one you could call a follow-up rather than a direct sequel. It tracks a few characters many years later, to see what they’re doing rather than directly dealing with the events of the first story.

Last week, I also mentioned how I think this version may have had a better idea of how to deal with this story and casting it. Now you can decide for yourself, and if you’ve stuck with it through two versions rent or buy the 1998 version, which is quite clearly still under copyright.

This film is one of those that proves that my annual Poverty Row theme is not always fruitless.

To watch the film visit the link below:

Little Men (1934)

Free Movie Friday: Little Men (1940)

Introduction

I wanted to start this series back in January. Basically, there are a lot of good movies out there that you can watch free and clear. Meaning you don’t have to pay for them <em>and </em>by streaming it free you’re not stealing it because they are in the public domain. Also, in some cases, these films are not all as ancient as copyright laws usually call for.

Little Men (1940)

I first became familiar with Louisa May Alcott’s not-quite-as-popular sequel to Little Women through the short-lived 1998-1999 TV series adaptation. Though TV may, in fact, be a better vehicle for the quotidien, schoolday adventures as Jo (Kay Francis) cares for her wayward students; some film versions have charmed me as well. Including one released in that year and earlier film versions.

This one is a low-budget rare showcase for Jimmy Lydon and a brisk introduction to the tale – an even brisker, earlier take and overall more well-cast adaptation was released in 1934. Enjoy!

Free Movie Friday: The Terror (1963)

I wanted to start this series back in January. Basically, there are a lot of good movies out there that you can watch free and clear. Meaning you don’t have to pay for them and by streaming it free you’re not stealing it because they are in the public domain. Also, in some cases, these films are not all as ancient as copyright laws usually call for.

To be honest if The Terror wasn’t one of Jack Nicholson’s first screen appearances it wouldn’t very memorable. However, he is in it and it is a middling film worthy of a look if only for the curiosity if nothing else. Enjoy!

Free Movie Friday: A Bucket of Blood

You need never fear that this site is running a theme that may not be your cup of tea for the plan this year is to always have content that runs a little bit counter to that. The current theme is March to Disney, but the Free Movies on Firday continue to be horror films.

Here is another AIP film. This another in the vein that Corman came out with after Psycho changed the game in the horror and thriller genres.

Free Movie Friday: I Bury the Living (1958)

In starting this theme in the horror genre I was glad to have found this film online. This was one of my favorite discoveries of 2011 and well worth viewing. My thoughts from back then were:

I remember after I saw this film I tried to remember where I first heard of it: it was in Stephen King’s non-fiction book about horror Danse Macabre. He listed it in an appendix as one of 100 excellent horror films released between 1950 and 1980 or so. I agreed with his assertion immediately. It’s a jarring film but brilliant at both ends so to speak.

Free Movie Friday: Vampyr (1932)

This theme is kicking off with horror before it expands to other genres. Next is the greatly atmospheric Carl Dreyer film based on Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla, the first such adaptation of the novel to the screen. It’s also the rare public domain and horror title that Criterion has given the royal treatment. Their extras, including the screenplay, are well worth checking out if you can get a hold of the box set.