In Anticipation Of: Who’s Your Daddy and the return of the Radar

Introduction

The In Anticipation Of posts have been a bit too infrequent on this site. However, I have created them both for films I eventually saw, like Mercy, and those that have not yet come to fruition, like The Necroscope.

Prologue

Usually after I release my BAM Awards on an annual basis I try my best to keep tabs on who was nominated so that I can see what they follow-up with. This is usually the case with directors, writers, and actors. Especially when they happen to be involved in foreign (to the US) productions, as you typically do have to be more proactive to watch them in something else.

Barring being overly-proactive you can only find new projects almost entirely by accident, which is how I learned about Who’s Your Daddy having just started pre-production.

Who’s Your Daddy

Who’s Your Daddy tells the tale of

Nineteen year old sweethearts Simon from Denmark and Ida from Norway has just come together and moved in an apartment in Oslo. To celebrate, they open a few bottles of red wine and decide to inaugurate the bedroom, which ends in a not-so-planned pregnancy. In Ida’s eyes, there must be changes in the house for her to want to keep the baby. He must begin to take more responsibility and stop spending all day playing Playstation and smoking weed with his buddies. He needs to get a better job, join the couples therapy: anything that can get the relationship on a new level. He must grow up. Ida moves out, and Simon embarks on a journey with buddies, a journey to learn responsibility, love and change his personality. A comedy about friendship, love and dead dogs.

and stars William Jøhnk Nielsen, Nikolaj Groth and Aurora Nossen. I’d previously seen Nielsen in In a Better World which he earned a BAM Nomination for in the first year I expanded the young acting categories.

Here were my thoughts on Nielsen’s performance in summation at year’s end:

William Jøhnk Nielsen has perhaps the most impressive “simmer” of these actors. He has a lot of anger and frustration to play and he has to work up to a boil frequently. It’s a different kind of emotion than most of these actors had to work which is why this is one of the few categories I decided to expand this category to six nominees, which was unprecedented until this year in three instances.

Later, Nielsen also played a small role in A Royal Affair, a tremendous film that brought Alicia Vikander to my attention, as well as inciting my fandom of Mads Mikkelsen.William Jøhnk (Clinton Gaughran)

However, since that brief appearance I had not seen him in anything. Fast forward a few years to where I serendipitously learned of his next project.

Conclusion

This movie sounds like a good one, and it’s great when actors in their late-teens/early-twenties are afforded roles true to their age and their transitory life stage, as opposed to playing down in age a few years merely to simplify production. So I look forward to what writer/director Marius Pinnås Sørvik (pictured in the header) brings to cross-cultural comedy of today’s youth.

I await this film eagerly, and will update this post as necessary. Overall I’ll not rest on chance too much anymore, so I will also begin a Watchlist on Letterboxd and take fuller advantage of Go Watch It from now on in lieu of the My Radar feature I once had here.

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