2014 BAM Award Considerations – October

I decided that with the plethora of BAM Awards-related post towards the end of 2013 and the start of this year it was best to wait to the end of this month before officially recommencing the process.

I will post these lists towards the end of the month to allow for minimal updates. By creating a new post monthly, and creating massive combo files offline, it should make the process easier for me and more user-friendly for you, the esteemed reader. Enjoy.

Eligible Titles

Dracula Untold
Hellaware
Summer of Blood
Mercy
Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Annabelle
Ouija
St. Vincent
The Day the Series Stopped
In the Heart
Abuse of Weakness
Moebius
1,000 Times Good Night
Fury
For a Woman
Cannibal
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl

Best Picture

St. Vincent
Fury
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl

Best Foreign Film

1,000 Times Good Night
Finn

Best Documentary

The Day the Series Stopped

Most Overlooked Film

As intimated in my Most Underrated announcement this year, I’ve decided to make a change here. Rather than get caught up in me vs. the world nonsense and what a film’s rating is on an aggregate site, the IMDb or anywhere else, I want to champion smaller, lesser-known films. In 2011 with the selection of Toast this move was really in the offing. The nominees from this past year echo that fact. So here, regardless of how well-received something is by those who’ve seen it, I’ll be championing indies and foreign films, and the occasional financial flop from a bigger entity.

Dracula Untold
Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
1,000 Times Good Night
Finn

Best Director
St. Vincent
Fury
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl

Best Actress

Kim van Kooten In the Heart
Isabelle Huppert Abuse of Weakness
Juliette Binoche 1,000 Times Good Night
Mélanie Thierry For a Woman
Olimpia Melinte Cannibal
Rosamund Pike Gone Girl

Best Actor

Luke Evans Dracula Untold
Bill Murray St. Vincent
Koen de Graeve In the Heart
Jae-hyun Jo Moebius
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau 1,000 Times Good Night
Robert Downey, Jr. The Judge
Ben Affleck Gone Girl

Best Supporting Actress

Melissa McCarthy St. Vincent
Eun-woo Lee Moebius
Vera Farmiga The Judge

Best Supporting Actor

Youg-ju Seo Moebius
Logan Lerman Fury
Jan Decleir Finn
Robert Duvall The Judge

Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Leading Role

Lauren Canny 1,000 Times Good Night

Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Leading Role

Chandler Riggs Mercy
Ed Oxenbould Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
Jaeden Lieberher St. Vincent
Mels van der Hoeven Finn

Best Performance by a Young Actress in a Supporting Role

Emma Tremblay The Judge
Adrianna Cramer Curtis 1,000 Times Good Night
Kerris Dorsey Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Supporting Role

Dario Barosso St. Vincent
Art Parkinson Dracula Untold
Joel Courtney Mercy

Best Cast

St. Vincent
Moebius
1,000 Times Good Night
Fury
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl
Dracula Untold
Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Best Youth Ensemble

1,000 Times Good Night
Finn
Mercy
Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Best Original Screenplay

St. Vincent
Moebius
1,000 Times Good Night
Fury
Finn
The Judge

Best Adapted Screenplay

Gone Girl
Dracula Untold
Alexander and the Terrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Best Score

Fury
Finn
Gone Girl
Dracula Untold

Best Editing

St. Vincent
Moebius
Fury
Finn
The Judge

Best Sound Editing/Mixing

Fury
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl
Dracula Untold

Best Cinematography

St. Vincent
Moebius
1,000 Times Good Night
Fury
Finn
The Judge
Gone Girl

Best Art Direction

St. Vincent
Moebius
Cannibal
Finn
Gone Girl

Best Costume Design

St. Vincent
Moebius
Fury
Cannibal
Finn
Dracula Untold

Best Makeup

St. Vincent
In the Heart
Moebius
1,000 Times Good Night
Fury
The Judge
Gone Girl

Best Visual Effects

Dracula Untold

Best (Original) Song

St. Vincent
In the Heart
1,000 Times Good Night
Finn
The Judge

Review: Annabelle

When The Conjuring came out, I, like many enjoyed it a great deal. Not necessarily like many, and moreover, a bit uncharacteristically; I was really psyched about the prospect of Annabelle. It was one of the rare cases where I thought a prequel, or more appropriately, a spin-off had the potential to expand a bit of backstory into a feature-length tale on equal footing with its progenitor.

After having seen it, however, it did bring to mind Dario Argento’s response to when I asked if he ever considered further examining the backstory of Deep Red. Basically, what this ended up feeling like was a vacuous money-grab even though it, and the Deep Red concept, still could theoretically work.

What Anabelle lacks is not only atmosphere, which it is sadly in wont of throughout, but also a compelling narrative. In The Conjuring James Wan and the Hayes brothers wrung out so much effect from this doll affectation to give the protagonists a background you were left wanting more, in getting it you are left dissatisfied.

One issue the film contends with is that it’s not really an origin. The accursed doll comes to the couple at the center of this story and they deal with it. However, that’s not really a fault of the film. One true fault is that its zest for innovation peters out on the first act when introducing the notion that the world is changing in light of the Charles Manson killings. Much of the rest of the film following the inciting sequence is methodical and rote, and rarely introduces a wrinkle that is unique to this tale.

BANG!

There. Are you scared yet? No, well then don’t see this movie, because as it is unable to generate palpable atmosphere, real concern, or interest, in its characters the film then resorts mostly to jump- and false-scares. This is really a shame because the score does have some nice moments but it has to be an accomplice to the lacking script and direction and try and pry scares out of its prospective audience.

One would think that it would be hard to bungle a film wherein one protagonist is either pregnant or raising an infant, but this film manages to quite easily. Some milquetoast performances along with all else that’s plain to lacking really doesn’t help.

To add insult to injury the obligatory, somewhat open ending is as anticlimactic as the rest of the film is. It’s rare I use the phrase “forgettable” as it usually employed crassly, but when one has recently experienced a film so empty, so devoid of soul and verve, that you could easily forget that you just saw it. “Forgettable” one of the most fitting words there are.

3/10